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Short Films

Foraging for the Future

  • Farmer Ian Walsh tells his story about restoring marginal farmland on his broad acre family property in Cranbrook Western Australia. The once marginal farmland has been restored using perennial forages and is now a productive and sustainable part of the whole farming system. Ian has worked with the CSIRO to measure methane emissions and production benefits of this restored part of the farm.

A Day in the Life of a Soil Scientist

  • “A day in the life of a soil scientist” takes us on a journey with soil scientist Tim Overheu,  who shows us what he does best, sharing his passion for soils with other people. Soils are the backbone of our existence. So what makes a healthy soil? How do we manage them? What can we do to improve them? To find out more click here…..

    "Soils are the fabric of my life. I love soils. I'm really passionate about extending information about soils and landscapes to regional communities."- Tim Overheu.

Why is Soil Carbon so Important?

  • How can you make your property more profitable and sustainable? By increasing your soil carbon.

    So what is soil carbon? How is it stored? Why would you want to improve it on your property? These answers and many more are explained in this short film based around soil carbon.

Microbes in the classroom

  • What do strawberries have in common with soil microbes? They are both jam-packed full of DNA!

    International soil scientist Professor Andrew Whiteley recently visited the Great Southern to teach children the importance of microbes to the environment and ourselves. Professor Whiteley uses DNA sequencing to map the soil microbes of Western Australia. In the classroom he showed students DNA by extracting it from strawberries.

Built for this country

  • This is the story of a Bremer Bay farming family who experienced severe wind erosion on their farm in 1982. It details what they did to overcome this and their adoption of a new approach to farming that has improved production and maintained soil carbon levels. These management practices have allowed them  to be opportunistic and make their  farming system more robust against future climate variability.

Salt and Samphire

  • West Australian farmers Tim and Val Saggers have been restoring salt affected land on their farm for more than a decade, using native perennial shrubs and grasses. Although native perennial pastures are not yet a popular option in WA compared to the eastern states, the Saggers’  have not been deterred and have managed to reclaim once unproductive land and made their farm more productive and sustainable for future use.